Teeny Tiny Toady (+ interview with the author!)

B is almost 3 years old. *Pinch* WHAT?!

Now, she examines books. She looks deeply at the illustrations and turns the page when she’s ready. She sits still for long periods of time. That’s a story time game changer in this house!

Last night she was desperate to read a superhero book– so a superhero book we picked.

teeny

In Teeny Tiny Toady, you’ll be led through rhyme to the time when Teeny became a hero. Teeny, a little teeny toad (and sister of seven brawny dudes,) witnessed a toad-napping. Her own Mother, captured and put inside a bucket. *GASP* Imagine…

“Hopping faster than she ever
in her tiny life had hopped,
hurry-scurry, wild with worry,
Teeny flopped
and plopped
and slopped,
dodging spiderwebs and mushrooms,
leaping bugs and sluggy mothers,
till she skidded through the door– at last!– to gasp…
I need you, brothers!”

Don’t you feel like you’re there?! Poor Teeny.

She wishes she could be strong like her brothers so she could help save their Mama. After several attempts to free her, the brothers accidentally ploop into the bucket (whoops!) and Teeny is forced to find her strength (hint: she’s a smart little chick) to save the day.

You won’t regret getting this one for your bookshelf. Esbaum’s story + Yamaguchi’s illlustrations = fireworks!

Read on to the very first interview on the blog with my very own Mom, Jill Esbaum. 🙂


What (or who) was the inspiration for Teeny?

Jill: Hmmm. I guess it would have to be the toads and frogs I used to capture while on family camping trips. I’ve always liked the tiniest ones. Thinking about those camping trips must have jogged something loose…maybe regret at the thought that I might possibly have forgotten to release them a time or two? How, I wondered, did the poor toads feel about being stuck in a bucket? 😦

I know there is often a lot of writing (and then re-writing!) that happens before a story is “complete.” How long did it take for Teeny and her family to come to life?

I started the story in early 2011, and Teeny and her dopey brothers sprang to life pretty quickly. By June, it was finished, so I sent it to my agent. A few rejections followed, one that took nearly A YEAR. I kept tweaking, smoothing lines, honing details, adding humor. The lines that never changed at all were the opening ones. I felt like those sort of dropped from the sky, honestly. In February of 2014, the story sold to Sterling. I did a few small revisions and, two years later, it was a book.

Did your visions for the story match up with the world the illustrator created?

Illustrator Keika Yamaguchi created a toady world that was better than anything I could have imagined! I was bowled over by her work. You feel like you’re right there in a lush toady paradise with Teeny and her brothers as they try to get their Mama out of the bucket. Who knew toads could be so roly-poly and adorable?

Which do you prefer? Toads or frogs?

Toads. They aren’t quite so quick to hop away, so they’re easier to catch. Plus, they’re dry, so they aren’t as slippery.

Blech. Next: what is your workspace like?

Neat and tidy, for a change. But that’s because I just went through every. single. paper. that’s been piling up all winter/spring, waiting to be filed or dealt with. Yay! I can see the top of my desk again!

You have several (how many?) published books. Which one was the easiest to write? The hardest?

I recently sold number 40, counting both picture books and the nonfiction books I do for National Geographic. The easiest book to write was I HATCHED! That’s because I dreamed it — in a little birdie voice that rhymed. When I woke up, I ran to my office and started jotting the lines I could remember. There were only TWO, but I remembered the gist of the whole thing, so that was a really fun (and quick) one to piece back together. The hardest … ? Probably I AM COW, HEAR ME MOO because it took me 10 years to find the right story for the main character, Nadine the cow. I wrote two totally different stories starring Nadine during that time, but they just didn’t feel right. So I’d put her story away for a few months or a couple of years before feeling myself pulled back in to try again.

Describe your perfect productive writing day.

A perfect writing day is rare. Like, sometimes-not-for-months rare. It happens when a) there’s nothing on my calendar, b) nobody waiting for anything from me, business-wise, c) my house is clean, and d) I have a manuscript I’m itching to work on. And if it’s raining, that’s even better, because there’s nothing I “should” be doing outdoors. 🙂 Most writing days are filled with other obligations, which is one reason I love writing picture books. I can think about them anytime, jotting notes into a little notebook no matter where I am, then working on them at home for half an hour here, two hours there.

Last one! How does it feel writing picture books that your grandchildren want to read?

Strange, like worlds colliding. But delightful, too. For so many years, my kids were no longer interested in picture books, and I didn’t have grandkiddos. So now, when one wanted to read HOW TO GROW A DINOSAUR every bedtime for weeks and the other wanted FRANKENBUNNY or TEENY TINY TOADY? Pretty cool. And surreal. Makes me want to write more books for them, while they’re still little.


Thanks, Mom, for everything.

Be sure to say hello in the comments! You can find more from Jill here:

http://jillesbaum.com/ or http://picturebookbuilders.com/

Teeny Tiny Toady (2016)
Jill Esbaum (Illus. Keika Yamaguchi)
Sterling Children’s Books

Duck & Goose Find a Pumpkin

“This one.”

“THIS one.”

“THIS ONE!”

We recently explored the pumpkin patch and if B had her way, we’d have 17 pumpkins on the front porch. We brought home one perfect pumpkin and she painted it. Ain’t it a beaut? 😉briaspumpkinWe’ve also been reading books that fit the season, like Seed, Sprout, Pumpkin, Pie by Jill Esbaum (Happy early birthday, Mom!) and a favorite since last year at this time, Duck & Goose Find a Pumpkin.duckandgoosepumpkinWhen sweet, silly Duck & Goose see their friend, Thistle, lugging his own beautiful pumpkin, they realize they need one, too. They search and search– looking in all sorts of places for their perfect pumpkin.

“Is our pumpkin in the log, Goose?”

“No.”

“Is our pumpkin in the leaf pile, Duck?”

“No.”

Around they go, looking everywhere except the one place that they’re sure to find a good pumpkin. Eventually, they find it– thanks to their friend Thistle.

Last year, 1.5 YO B picked up on the repetition of this book and it was so much fun to read the book with her, and she still loves the call and response aspect of this book.

Duck & Goose Find a Pumpkin
Tad Hills
Schwartz & Wade Books

Colors!

To any of you who know her (or know of her) it will not surprise you that my Mom has an awesome kid library in her office.

img_3244

What we love about Grammy Jill‘s library: Mom, lots of titles to choose from, a big rug to lay on, a comfy, old rocking chair to sit on, and no overdue fees for books you take and never return!

We’ll return it, soon, probably.

img_3245

National Geographic Kids Look & Learn: Colors! is interactive and illustrated with beautiful, brightly colored photographs.  Each section shows several examples of things that are one color (duck, bananas, school bus, etc…), and on the next spread, your little one is challenged to hunt and find all of that special color– blue, green, orange, red, or yellow.

Included in the spread are fun facts for the kids and adults. While looking for the color blue on a ferris wheel, we learned that the world’s tallest ferris wheel is higher than 40 elephants! Nooooo, thank you.

I know there are a few more National Geographic Kids Look & Learn books in Mom’s library– and I think it’s time to “check out” another!

National Geographic Kids Look & Learn: Colors!
Ruth Musgrave
National Geographic Society